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The Ecology of Food is an exploration of food from the following perspectives: the importance of food (requirements for human health, supply and demand), the distribution of starvation and abundance, the ecological and economic reasons for this distribution, the amount and sources of energy involved in food production, the role of food production in sustainability issues (water, energy and soil/nutrient supply), the economics of food and food production, various forms of agriculture used to produce food and, finally, food security in a global marketplace. The goal of the course is not to make you feel guilty (or happy) about your diet but to raise your awareness about the food you eat, what it actually is, where it comes from, how we got to the point that we eat the way we do and whether where we are at is necessarily where we want to be. Along the way, we will all learn a lot about topics we have never thought about long enough or deeply enough. My hope is that we will all have a greater appreciation of food and our relationship to it by the time the course is over.


Liberation Theology is a strand of theology that began to take shape in the 1960s under the leadership of Catholic theologians and priests from Central and South America.  Since its inception, it has been adopted, adapted, and developed by a variety of groups from various religious backgrounds across the globe. The purpose of this course is to explore the historical, theological, and practical elements of Liberation Theology.  The course will consist of reading primary and secondary texts by scholars from Latin America, Africa, Asia, and North America.  Along the way, we will consider such things as the historical background of Liberation Theology, the core elements of Liberation Theology, whether or not there is a Liberation Theology or many Liberation Theologies, if Liberation Theology is specific to the Christian tradition, and the relationship between orthodoxy and orthopraxy.  We will also evaluate the critiques that have been levied against Liberation Theology and ask whether or not those critiques are consistent with the intentions of those who practice Liberation Theology.  One of the concluding goals of this course is to develop the capacity to articulate the contours of Liberation Theology to a broad audience and demonstrate how it can be applied in our contemporary context.


The introduces students to, and offers a basis for the critique of, the most common categories by which contemporary religions are compared: history, scripture, rituals, ethics, and political claims. It is a level II CTI course, cross-listed as a 200 level religion course, satisfying aspects of the religion major. This version is created to meet the demands for a Tuesday-Thursday version of the course.

This Moodle houses the ACT-In Major's certification forms.

So, you want to be a biologist? Then welcome to the William Jewell College biology department! We are excited that you’re here. As you begin your college career and your biology major you will find that your life in college, the ways you interact with course material, and the scientific pursuit as a whole is different than you expect.  In some cases this will be a great and wonderful discovery, and in some cases this may be disappointing or disorienting.  The goals of this course are to introduce you to a community of peer and departmental support, and to give you the tools to think about who you are in relationship to the exciting and wonderful endeavor of science.

Through completion of this course you will:

  • Become familiar with the structure, philosophy, and community of the William Jewell College biology department
  • Reflect on the nature of the scientific endeavor and the scientific profession, and relate these to your own personal identity and goals

Evolution and Ecology is the first of four courses in the core Biology curriculum. Though you are enrolled in separate lecture and lab courses, we treat them as an integrated whole. You will be introduced to the basic concepts, principles, and theories of ecology and evolution. Since E&E is the foundational course for the entire Biology curriculum, you will also be developing skills required by a scientist, which will help you throughout your studies in Biology. These skills include asking testable, scientific questions, seeking answers through literature and experiments, working collaboratively with your peers, building and exploring mathematical models, and communication of scientific information, among others. 

      The “lecture” portion of the course will focus on a series of case studies we have designed based upon well-studied ecological/evolutionary systems. Each case includes learning basic ecological/evolutionary principles, as well as the statistical analysis required to understand the primary scientific literature upon which the case studies are based. I have put lecture in quotations because in this course, there will be relatively few days when we will be standing in front of the class delivering material while you sit passively taking notes. Instead, this course is designed around the best practices of teaching, which involve multiple types of active learning. In this learner-centered environment, you will be an active participantin the classroom. You should be prepared to collaborate in small groups, discuss readings, both in small groups and as a class, work problems on the board, and, in general, be engaged in your learning. 

      The focus of the laboratory portion of the course is to put into practice the scientific method through the development and implementation of group research projects. The class will be divided up into groups of 4 – 6 students. Each group will generate a testable ecological question, design an experiment, collect data, analyze the data, and present the findings in a group oral presentation to the rest of the class. In addition, each student will write an individual lab report on their project. We will guide you through each step of the process, through which you will begin developing skills required of a scientist. 

            This is the first course in a four semester sequence of introductory biology classes.  It is followed by Biological Diversity, Cell and Molecular Biology, and Genetics. The semester will integrate ecological and evolutionary understanding through a series of case studies that concentrate attention on three well-studied ecological or evolutionary systems.


A survey of photosynthetic organisms, including their morphology, physiology, ecology, systematics and economic importance.


Welcome to Cell and Molecular Biology! This is a course in three parts.  First, we will learn about the chemical structures and properties of the three most important molecules that form life: nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids.  Then, we will apply this knowledge to understand how cells are structured and how they work.  At each step, we will ask ourselves: How do the chemical properties of the molecules that compose the cell contribute to its function?  Finally, we will use our understanding of how cells and the molecules that compose them work to understand how cells participate together in the biology of an organism.

Through completion of this course you will be able to:

  • Describe the chemistry of nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids
  • Analyze the function and clinical implications of compartmentalization, organization, and regulation of cellular processes
  • Explain how the chemistry of nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids determine and shape these cellular processes
  • Articulate how the chemistry, structure, and behavior of cells combine to form the biology of whole organisms
  • Work independently to apply previous course knowledge to new biological systems or problems

This site is primarily so you can use turnitin.com to check you papers for plagiarism.

Welcome to the oddly named course, "So you want to be a biologist"! Although the course name is strange, it is an accurate reflection of the foci of the course: 

  1. Helping you discover if Biology is the correct career path for you.
  2. Laying the foundation for you to be a successful biology major at William Jewell College.
Specifically, we will address the questions:
  • What career options are available for someone with a degree in biology?
  • How do I figure out what I want to do with my life? How can I be sure this career is a good fit for me? How do I begin preparing for my chosen career? 
  • What is the best way to study for college-level biology courses? 
  • What skills and information do I need to succeed in science? For example, what needs to be included in a scientific laboratory report? How can I read scientific literature effectively?
  • What is the benefit of doing research as an undergraduate? What research opportunities are available at WJC? What off-campus research opportunities are available? When should I begin doing research?
  • What will my class schedule look like for the next four years? Should I pursue a second major? A minor? What courses do I need to take for my chosen career path?
  • What credentials will I need in order to get accepted to graduate school? Medical school? Professional School?

Cell and molecular biology is the study of the molecular basis of life. It is based on the foundations of four classical disciplines: biochemistry, cell biology, microbiology and genetics.  The laboratory section of this course will provide you with experience using modern molecular biological and cellular techniques to further explore these concepts, and give you the opportunity to design, execute, analyze and present your own questions in cell and molecular biology.


The term “molecular genetics” encompasses the study of how the genome functions on a molecular scale, and describes a group of tools that can be used to answer questions on nearly all biological topics and scales of study. Because the term encompasses such a variety of topics and tools, this course should be useful to all biology, biochemistry, chemistry, or molecular biology students, regardless of the main interest/s of each student. Prerequisite: BIO 234.

After taking this course, you should be able to:

  1. Describe the known types of genes, and identify how each produces one or more phenotype/s.
  2. Describe and use major molecular genetic tools and techniques, e.g. gene discovery, determination of gene function, and genome editing.
  3. Provide examples of how molecular genetic tools or concepts could be used in your planned post-graduate career.
  4. Identify and critically discuss ethical issues surrounding modern genetic and genomic methods and clinical applications.


A comprehensive study of the function of all organ systems of the human body with a focus on their role in maintaining a constant internal environment (homeostasis). The laboratory supplements and reinforces the material introduced in lecture through the use of case studies and laboratory activities. Prerequisite: CHE 113 or CHE 121. A course at another institution that has an online laboratory will not be accepted as a substitute for BMS 250 and 250L.


This course is designed for any first-year student interested in pursuing a career as a physician, dentist, optometrist, or veterinarian. After exploring the spectrum of medical professions and the characteristics of competitive applicants to medical professional schools, each student will begin writing a personal statement for her/his future application. Additionally, the course exposes students to a variety of current issues in healthcare, including topics related to bioethics, clinical trials and cultural competency. By the end of the course, students will better understand their intended medical profession and how to prepare a compelling application for that program. There are no prerequisites for this course; however, instructor’s consent is required for any non-first year students to register.


Human Anatomy is the study of the external and internal structures of the human body as well as the relationships between these structures and how their function is determined by their form. It is anticipated that this course will serve as an introduction to the anatomy of the human body particularly for those entering the biomedical sciences. 

This course is designed for any first-year student interested in pursuing a career as a physician, dentist, optometrist or veterinarian. After exploring the spectrum of medical professions and the characteristics of competitive applicants to medical professional schools, each student will begin writing a personal statement for her/his future application and practice interviewing skills. Additionally, the course exposes students to a variety of current issues in healthcare, including topics related to bioethics and evidence based medicine research. By the end of the course, students will better understand their intended medical profession and how to prepare a compelling application for that program. There are no prerequisites for this course; however, instructor’s consent is required for any non- first year students to register. Fall semester.

This course is designed for any first-year student interested in pursuing a career as a physician, dentist, optometrist or veterinarian. After exploring the spectrum of medical professions and the characteristics of competitive applicants to medical professional schools, each student will begin writing a personal statement for her/his future application and practice interviewing skills. Additionally, the course exposes students to a variety of current issues in healthcare, including topics related to bioethics and evidence based medicine research. By the end of the course, students will better understand their intended medical profession and how to prepare a compelling application for that program. There are no prerequisites for this course; however, instructor’s consent is required for any non- first year students to register. Fall semester.


Human Physiology is the study of the mechanisms by which the human body functions. Students will learn the basic functions of each body system and how the relate to one another to maintain homeostasis. It is anticipated that this course will serve as an introduction to the function of the human body particularly for those entering the biomedical sciences.


Introduction to Human Anatomy for those preparing for careers in the biomedical sciences.

In this course we will be introduced to the amazing world of microorganisms that exist all around and within us, and learn about the different ways that these organisms influence our lives.


BUS 455 is an Advanced Consulting Engagement in which students function as a consulting team on one or more live projects in the business world.  We will engage a client early in the semester, determine the scope of the project and work together to deliver a findings report and recommendations by semester-end.  This is an extremely invigorating class for students who want a hands-on challenge in a real business environment. 

The arc of this course will begin with on overview of business strategy and the McKinsey Consulting model and will then practice critical thinking through analysis and hands-on experiential learning of current business issues via client interaction and real business issues.  The class will culminate with a presentation to the client of the final work product, including billable hours, and final recommendations with supporting rationale.


As the capstone course in the business major, this course seeks to integrate and apply the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the major.  Through case studies and hands-on business strategizing and planning, students use the interrelated best practices of accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, and operations to solve real business problems and identify real business opportunities.  The knowledge, skill, and virtue goals of the Department of Business and Leadership are cultivated and reinforced throughout the course.

The arc of this course will begin with on overview of business strategy and will then practice critical thinking through analysis and hands-on experiential learning of current business issues via case study, new business development, critical business literature review, and multiple stategy debates.  Students will also be exposed to various career opportunities via class speakers, as well as career preparation via resume, Linked In, and interviewing tutorials, and Life After Jewell sessions.


This course will examine the importance of public policy advocacy for nonprofit organizations (NPOs) and the impact of nonprofit advocacy on society and social change. LSP 360 K/ POL 217 K places a special emphasis on the evolution of government out of the state of nature through a social contract, the evolution of civil society, American Exceptionalism, the American Creed and modern political parties. It also examines social movements, civil disobedience and the tumultuous 1960s. It will review the policy-making process and NPOs’ role(s) in the process. It will analyze the diverse range of strategies—such as research, building coalitions, convening, civil discourse, grassroots mobilization, lobbying, working with media, and use of social media—that are available to NPOs to carry out their mission and promote their advocacy goals.

The course will culminate in planning, implementing and evaluating a successful advocacy campaign. The course will meet once a week in a small seminar format. Because of the size of the class, students will be expected to not only participate in class discussions but also lead class discussions through the Harkness® Method. Through dialogue and application, students will learn to think critically; identify action issues related to mission; create legislative agendas; form public policy positions; identify stakeholders; and implement advocacy strategies.


This entrepreneurial internship course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to have a practical experience in an entrepreneurial setting.  

To introduce accounting research techniques and the opportunity to practice them.

Organization and implementation of information technology for the collection, organization, and presentation of accounting information with an experiential education and application of systems thinking. 

Accounting for not-for-profit organizations and state and local governments. Prerequisite: ACC 111 with a grade of C- or better.


Fundamentals of managerial cost accounting including cost/benefit analysis, behavioral considerations, cost-volume-profit analysis, ethics, management control systems, performance measurements, basic costing systems, budgeting, allocation processes, different costs for different purposes and strategic analysis. Prerequisite: ACC 111 with a grade of C- or better. Recommended: ECO 101.


ACC 311 Intermediate Financial Accounting I (4 cr. hrs.)

Application of accounting theory, standards, principles and procedures for understanding nancial accounting. Study of the objectives of external nancial statements and professional accounting. Particular emphasis on assets, liabilities and corporate capitalization. Prerequisite: ACC 111 with a grade of C- or better.


Organization and implementation of information technology for the collection, organization, and presentation of accounting information with an experiential education and application of systems thinking. 



This course studies the role of the external auditor in the financial markets, the environment in which the auditor operates, planning and audit risk assessment, auditing procedures, audit sampling, and audit reports.

The course goal is to increase awareness and develop an appreciation of the overall audit process and its practice which includes developing an understanding of the components, steps, and outcomes of an audit.  Course includes such concepts as internal controls, audit risk analysis, ethical and professional auditing standards, materiality, substantive testing, the audit plan, fraud risks, etc.

Recommended Prerequisites: ACC 312 (C- or better)

This course provides an introduction to Financial Accounting.  Emphasis is placed on measuring, processing, analyzing, and interpreting elements of the four basic financial statements.

The course goal is to increase awareness of the overall process and objective of financial accounting as well as develop an understanding of the elements required to create financial statements.  Course includes such concepts as the balance sheet (and related components), the income statement (and related components), stockholders' equity, the cash flow statement, and internal controls.

Recommended Prerequisites: CTI 103, CTI 105, CTI 107 or CTI 109. 

Marketing Principles presents strategies for optimal marketing and distribution of products and services. We will examine how marketing consequences influence the decisions marketing managers make. The course emphasizes product planning, promotion, distribution, and pricing based on theories of consumer behavior and market segmentation. The arc of this course will begin with on overview of Marketing strategy and will then fill in each foundational area such as Environmental Scanning, Consumer Behavior, Product development, Service marketing, Pricing strategy, Distribution strategy, Promotion strategy, Global marketing, and Organizational marketing issues. Students will learn the general principles for each area and will then practice skills and demonstrate learning via hands-on experiments, in-class research, and out of class field trips.


This course is focused on giving students hands-on business project experience. Students are assigned to 2-3 person teams and assigned to local businesses to work on actual business projects covering such topics as new product development; identifying new consumer segments; researching various cost and pricing options or new channels of distribution; or developing new promotional campaigns.  Students work closely with the client and the professor to develop project management plans used in actual business.  Students also develop crtitical thinking skills by reading business publications and interacting with other students via written reviews and debate on key themes.  


The primary objective of this course is to provide the students with comprehensive exposure to the significant topics facing the Sports Business industry.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

 

Through a range of class lectures, class discussions, relevant guest speakers and possibly experiential learning opportunities, students will be exposed to multiple major topics affecting the business side of sport. Students Will:

 

1.   Become familiar with key concepts & terminology that are unique and relevant to the sports business industry.

2.   Understand and demonstrate the importance of management, finance and marketing principles as they pertain to global sports entities.

3.   Gain an appreciation for the unique challenges involved in managing sports business enterprises in rapidly changing environments.


This course is a survey of the major human resource management functions including legal concerns, planning, staffing, training and development, performance management, compensation, health and safety and employee and labor relations. Behavioral research in the area will be examined. Special application exercises or service-learning opportunities are used to enhance skill development. Prerequisites: BUS 202 and sophomore standing

Financial Development for Nonprofit Organizations offers an introduction to the practices and principles of philanthropy and fundraising in the management of nonprofit organizations. The course will explore the nature and essential elements of the fundraising process including the sources of philanthropic gifts, causes that receive support and motivations that influence giving. Time will be devoted to creating a WHY and case statement for a nonprofit, introduce specific development tools such as the annual development plan, major gifts programs, special events and grant writing. This course will also investigate and discuss the impact of earned income strategies in a nonprofit context.


An overview of the nonprofit sector and the role mission plays in philanthropy and volunteerism in American Society. Emphasis is placed upon the study of various roles and diversity of fields in the nonprofit sector, including but not limited to religion, arts and culture, education, health, environment, youth and human services. The course will provide an examination of the social history of nonprofit organizations in the United States, to develop an historical perspective and a sense of magnitude, scope, and functions of the nonprofit sector and its relationships with business and government. Study focuses on ethical, moral, and practical issues in nonprofit leadership, the trust the third sector holds in relationship to other social sectors and the sector’s responsibility to serve the common good.


This course is designed to help students appreciate the roles and responsibilities of boards, how nonprofit boards function and what constitutes effective boards and individual board members. It will incorporate exercises on typical governance problems for students to investigate best practices and solutions to those problems.

 

Students will study the history of nonprofit boards and how boards of the future will meet new leadership challenges and demands. They will study the increased scrutiny that nonprofit organizations face regarding accountability and transparency by federal and state regulators and the overall governance structure of nonprofit organizations.


This course offers an introduction to the practices and principles of philanthropy and fundraising in the management of nonprofit organizations. Together we will explore the nature and essential elements of the fundraising process including the sources of philanthropic gifts, causes that receive support, and motivations that influence giving. Time will be devoted to creating a WHY and case statement for a nonprofit and to introducing specific development tools such as the annual development plan, major gifts programs, special events, and grant writing. This course will also investigate and discuss the impact of earned income strategies in a nonprofit context.

An overview of the nonprofit sector and the role mission plays in philanthropy and volunteerism in American Society. Emphasis is placed upon the study of various roles and diversity of fields in the nonprofit sector, including but not limited to religion, arts and culture, education, health, environment, youth and human services. The course will provide an examination of the social history of nonprofit organizations in the United States, to develop an historical perspective and a sense of magnitude, scope, and functions of the nonprofit sector and its relationships with

business and government. Study focuses on ethical, moral, and practical issues in nonprofit leadership, the trust the third sector holds in relationship to other social sectors and the sector’s responsibility to serve the common good.


This course will introduce students to the elements of volunteer management and engage them in a variety of community service opportunities, including interviews and projects. Course objectives include:

  • Examine the foundations, motivations and challenges of developing a successful volunteer program.
  • Study the key components of a successful volunteer program, recruitment strategies and learn how to retain good volunteers.
  • Focus on the role, value and dynamics of volunteerism in fulfilling the missions of nonprofits.
  • Be introduced to risk management factors that need to be considered in volunteer management, including effective staff and volunteer screening.

This course will examine the importance of public policy advocacy for nonprofit organizations (NPOs) and the impact of nonprofit advocacy on society and social change. LSP 360/POL 217 K places a special emphasis on the evolution of government out of the state of nature through a social contract, the evolution of civil society, American Exceptionalism and the American Creed. It also examines social movements, civil disobedience and the tumultuous 1960s. It will review the policy-making process and NPOs’ role(s) in the process. It will analyze the diverse range of strategies—such as research, building coalitions, convening, civil discourse, grassroots mobilization, lobbying, working with media, and use of social media—that are available to NPOs to carry out their mission and promote their advocacy goals.

                                                                  

The course will culminate in a discussion of and project on organizational capacity building to plan, implement, and evaluate a successful advocacy campaign. The course will meet once a week in a small seminar format. Because of the size of the class, students will be expected to not only participate in class discussions but also lead class discussions through the Harkness® Method. Through dialogue and application, students will learn to think critically; identify action issues related to mission; create legislative agendas; form public policy positions; identify stakeholders; and implement advocacy strategies.


Strategic planning is defined as a disciplined effort to produce fundamental decisions and actions that shape what an organization is, what it does, and why it does it (Bryson, 2004). The external environments or organizations are becoming more complex and increasingly uncertain as a result of various political, social, economic and technological changes. These dynamic environments compel public, private and third sector managers to identify priorities, focus scarce resources on those priorities, craft effective strategies and implement them successfully to ensure survival in the long term. Strategic management provides managers with a future perspective, an external focus, a fundamental problem-solving orientation and a set of practical tools.

 

The intent of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the approaches and methods used in strategic decision making and of the effective leadership of boards, staff, volunteers and clients in the process. It will acquaint students with the theoretical underpinnings of strategic planning and help them master some strategic planning techniques such as environmental scanning, stakeholder analysis, strategic issue identification and strategy formulation by providing an opportunity to create a strategic plan for a nonprofit agency. The course will also review the various facilitation styles used in organizations.


This course is designed to help students appreciate the roles and responsibilities of boards, how nonprofit boards function and what constitutes effective boards and individual board members. It will incorporate exercises on typical governance problems for students to investigate best practices and solutions to those problems.

Students will study the history of nonprofit boards and how boards of the future will meet new leadership challenges and demands. They will study the increased scrutiny that nonprofit organizations face regarding accountability and transparency by federal and state regulators and the overall governance structure of nonprofit organizations.


A variety of strategies and resources will be examined about helping people who experience heightened suffering, oppression and poverty. Special attention will be given to various perspectives about service through the study of nonprofit organizations, volunteerism and individual service models. Students’ individual strengths will be assessed for the purposes of applying them toward interventions. Each student is required to complete 30 hours of community service during the semester. This course may be taken as LSP 201 or SVL 201 to meet the requirements of the Nonprofit Leadership major or of the William Jewell College Nonprofit Leadership Certificate Program. Prerequisite: LSP 101 or SVL 101 or permission of the instructor. Cross-listed as SVL 201.


This course examines a variety of human and social conditions that disrupt healthy, joyful, meaningful and satisfying lives. This course will focus on the intersection of suffering, oppression and poverty and the role of nonprofit interventions. Each student is required to complete 15 hours of community service in LSP 101. This course may be taken as LSP 101 or SVL 101 to meet the requirements of the Nonprofit Leadership major or of the William Jewell College Nonprofit Leadership Certificate Program. Cross-listed as SVL 101.


This portfolio will be used to document activity for the William Jewell College Nonprofit Leadership Certificate. 

This portfolio will be used to document activity for the William Jewell College Nonprofit Leadership Certificate. 

Nonprofit Leadership Preferred Internship Program including:

1. Overview of process
2. Important internship placement resources
3. Internship paperwork that is used for course credit requirements
4. Current internship opportunities
5. Contact Information

Course Description:

TheVolunteer Internship is a non-paid experience fostering civic volunteerism and civic leadership. (Student must serve in a nonprofit organization or agency. Student may receive a stipend to cover expenses but not a salary.)


This class will introduce students to leadership theory, engage them in a variety of self-discovery exercises, provide them with individual and collaborative leadership experiences, and assist them in preparing and executing a Leadership Growth Plan (LGP).


This course focuses on the legal issues and organizational risks affecting nonprofit organizations that are likely to be confronted by nonprofit leaders. Content includes strategies to create and perpetuate safe and productive environments for all stakeholders; effects of sound decision making to diminish and control corporate and individual liability. This course provides the student with a basic grounding in the laws and regulations governing nonprofit organizations. In addition, students will study the risk management factors that need to be fully considered in nonprofit leadership but are not limited to,insurance basics, managing employment risks, managing governance risks, special event safety, managing facility risks, and risk management for youth and human service programs.


This class will introduce students to leadership theory, engage them in a variety of self-discovery exercises, provide them with individual and collaborative leadership experiences, and assist them in preparing and executing a Leadership Growth Plan (LGP).


Physical Chemistry Laboratory is designed to expose students to common laboratory techniques employed in Physical Chemistry and to bring home real-world observations and applications of concepts learned in the concurrent lecture course.  Students will gain competency in the production, recording, and reporting of laboratory data.

Physical Chemistry, an upper-level course for Chemistry and Biochemistry majors, revisits topics from General Chemistry with mathematical rigor and deeper insight. The course seeks to answer four central questions key in the study of Chemistry:  (1) How do we describe matter? (2) How do we study and characterize matter? (3) What is the direction of chemical change? (4) How fast does chemical change occur?  Each question is answered respectively from the perspective of Physical Chemistry by (1) Quantum Mechanics, (2) Spectroscopy, (3) Thermochemistry & Equilibrium, and (4) Kinetics. An emphasis will be made in relating these topics to applications in understanding chemical and biological systems.

A general chemistry course is designed to introduce you to a variety of elementary scientific and chemical topics.  This course provides the student with the foundational material to continue into CHE 122.

The purpose of General Chemistry I Laboratory (CHE 121L) is to introduce students to basic techniques of laboratory experiments while also applying the concepts learned from the concurrent lecture.  Topics covered include the basics of laboratory measurement and quantifying and characterizing chemical substances. 

The course will be taught through a “guided-inquiry” approach, meaning that each concept is introduced in the form of an investigative question which must be answered through experimentation.

An introduction for the non-science major to the basic principles of chemistry will be accomplished in this course. Topics from general chemistry include accuracy and precision in scientific measurement, graphing relationships in chemistry experiments, molecular structures, gas laws, heats of solution, chemical reactions, chemical nomenclature, atomic structure, chemical energy, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, solutions, acids and bases and buffers, chemical kinetics, spectroscopy, and an introduction to organic synthesis. The course complements CHE 113 lecture and is designed for students who have little or no background in chemistry.Students enrolling in this lab course must be enrolled in CHE 113

Building on the course material in CHE 121, the student will learn about and apply fundamental chemical concepts that will lay the groundwork for future study in the fields of chemistry, bio-chemistry, and related fields.

            Objectives:

1.  Learn problem-solving techniques.

2.  Learn about fundamental concepts including:

a.     Gas laws

b.     Reaction kinetics

c.     Acid-base chemistry

d.     Thermochemistry

e.     Spectroscopy (interaction between light    and matter)

f.      Molecular structure (VSPER, hybridization)

g.     Chemical equilibrium

h.     Reduction-oxidation chemistry (including electrochemistry and oxidation states)

3.     Explore other chemical phenomena including biochemical processes of photo-synthesis and fermentation


The purpose of the laboratory portion of this course is to provide you, the student, with the opportunity to "do" chemistry.  The experiments are designed to provide an active learning environment.  The laboratory experiences will reinforce your understanding of the scientific method and various chemical phenomena.  The experiments have been selected to enhance the classroom discussion and provide answers to many of the questions posed in lecture course.  Students will work in pairs or groups to gather data, design experiments, and evaluate information.

As a course with a focus on obtaining and using chemical information this course will involve a discussion of ethical issues pertaining to obtaining, creating, and disseminating chemical information. An overview of parameters involved in ethical decision-making will be introduced, with presentations of case studies. Students will be introduced to the use of chemical literature and techniques of technical writing. The course is designed to expose students to the various resources used by chemists to research a chemical topic. During the first part of the semester, students will learn about techniques for searching for chemical information and about available resources for accessing chemical information. A field trip to Linda Hall Library will expose students to this premiere science and technology library in Kansas City. The course culminates in a final oral research report presented in a technical report format about a chemical compound family. As a rule, one-hour lecture periods are scheduled; however, the field trip to Linda Hall Library will require a two to three-hour session.


This course in organic chemistry begins with atomic structure and builds through functional group chemistry. The interactions between structure, reactivity, and synthesis strategy are stressed.Typical topics include atomic and molecular structure; stereochemistry; reaction mechanisms; organic spectroscopy; and the chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes.

The purpose of this course is to teach the student the basic methods used in the organic chemistry laboratory. Topics covered will include separation and purification of organic compounds by extraction, recrystallization, distillation, and chromatography.  Characterization of organic compounds by physical properties, chemical properties, and by the use of spectroscopy is also covered.  An introduction to the synthesis of organic compounds is also given.

Biochemistry is the study of the chemistry of life.  Thus, this course explores the molecular interactions of biomolecules.  With this focus, it will incorporate concepts from organic and inorganic chemistry, genetics, microbiology, cell biology and molecular biology.  The student will be required to build on concepts he/she has learned in previous biology and chemistry courses to successfully complete this course.  With this in mind, the outcomes of this course will be: 

  1. to understand the relationship between structure and function of biomolecules
  2. to understand the inter-relationship of biochemical reactions
  3. to incorporate these concepts into a well-rounded understanding of the activity of organelles and cells
  4. to gain skills in reading and understanding primary literature discussing biomolecules
  5. to gain more knowledge of the following chemical concepts:        a.  chemical kinetics, especially in relationship to enzyme                   kinetics
        b.  thermochemistry

        c.  oxidation-reduction chemistry



This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of learning processes and to increase classroom-learning effectiveness. Students will learn about various techniques in reading, test taking, time managing, note taking and studying. The students will be using their best techniques in current courses. Elective credit only.

Taken from Jewell's 2019-20 Course Catalog, pg. 121.

This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of learning processes and to increase classroom-learning effectiveness. Students will learn about various techniques in reading, test taking, time managing, note taking and studying. The students will be using their best techniques in current courses. Elective credit only.

Taken from Jewell's 2019-20 Course Catalog, pg. 121.

This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of learning processes and to increase classroom-learning effectiveness. Students will learn about various techniques in reading, test taking, time managing, note taking and studying. The students will be using their best techniques in current courses. Elective credit only.

Taken from Jewell's 2018-19 Course Catalog, pg. 122.

Judaism, Christianity and Islam (JCI) is a mid-level religion course in the religion major and also counts as a Level II CTI course in the core curriculum entitled, "The Responsible Self." To those ends the course is designed to fulfill the objectives of both the religion major and the Level II CTI "Sacred and Secular" objectives [link to objectives of both]. JCI offers students an introductory comparison of the three monotheistic religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The three are compared in reference to the following five criteria: historical origins, scripture, worship, ethics and political presence.

This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of learning processes and to increase classroom-learning effectiveness. Students will learn about various techniques in reading, test taking, time managing, note taking and studying. The students will be using their best techniques in current courses. Elective credit only.

As taken from William Jewell's Course Catalog.

This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of learning processes and to increase classroom-learning effectiveness. Students will learn about various techniques in reading, test taking, time managing, note taking and studying. The students will be using their best techniques in current courses. Elective credit only.

Jewell's Course Catalog, pg. 122
This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of learning processes and to increase classroom-learning effectiveness. Students will learn about various techniques in reading, test taking, time managing, note taking and studying. The students will be using their best techniques in current courses. Elective credit only.

Jewell's Course Catalog, pg. 122

A Moodle for the 2018 Jewell Faculty Workshop, "Critical Thinking In Our Time & At Jewell"

Welcome to the 2017 Faculty Workshop Moodle site.  You will find the agenda, our reading materials, and supplementary materials here.

This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of learning processes and to increase classroom-learning effectiveness. Students will learn about various techniques in reading, test taking, time managing, note taking and studying. The students will be using their best techniques in current courses.

Elective credit only.

This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of learning processes and to increase classroom-learning effectiveness. Students will learn about various techniques in reading, test taking, time managing, note taking and studying. The students will be using their best techniques in current courses.

Elective credit only.

This course introduces students to research methods applicable to an academic career at William Jewell and responsible participation in the wider scholarly community. An understanding of how information is organized and efficiently located will be gained through the application of information-seeking practices. Students will critically analyze the credibility of a variety of information resources and gain skills to independently identify and select appropriate scholarly resources. Citation styles, ethical use of information and plagiarism will also be addressed. 1 hour Elective credit only.

A survey course designed to introduce students to such concepts as cultural differences, cultural belief systems, culture shock and acculturation, language of culture, and multicultural nonverbal messages.


Welcome to COM 110! Whether you have decided to major or minor in the study of Communication, Public Relations, or Digital Media Communication, or if this class just looked like an interesting elective, I’m glad you are here to learn more about the study of communication. In this class you will gain a basic understanding of communication theory and terminology, and learn to apply it in a number of communication contexts. In particular, you will learn how the meaning of communication messages changes based on the ideological, cultural, and contextual assumptions and implications that all participants bring to the message.


This course introduces students to the fundamental practices of performing work onstage and backstage in theater. Topics covered are the safe use of tools and stage equipment, basic scenery, props, and costume construction techniques, basic lighting hang and focus and sound practices, and publicity and marketing methods. The healthy lifestyle of theatre artists also will be discussed. This class is a prerequisite for THE 213-216 and THE 219.

Course Description

A study of speech communication theory and practice. The practice and presentation of various forms of speech communication activities.

Course Objectives

The Communication Learning Outcome being assessed for this course is: Our students will prepare, organize and deliver well-written, verbal and non-verbal messages crafted for a particular audience and context.

This will guide the work students do in class as they prepare speeches for several types public speaking settings: Introductions, Informative Speaking, Persuasive Speaking, and Special Occasion Speaking.


The senior communication capstone course.

Designed to guide students into an understanding of small group communication processes and theories so they can function effectively in small groups. The students will be able to put theory into practice during their small group interaction throughout the semester. Discussion, small group activities, and projects allow students to monitor individual growth as group members and potential leaders.
Examines the theories and methods of public relations in the modern organization. Students will develop the analytical skills necessary to identify and solve public relations problems while increasing their understanding of the legal and ethical constraints upon the public relations professional.
Designed to guide students into an understanding of interpersonal communication and theory so they can function effectively in interactions with others. Students gain experience and understanding in areas such as self-concept, listening, and conflict resolution. Discussion, small group activities, and skill improvement projects allow the student to monitor individual growth.

This course is a course in advanced public speaking.  By the end of the semester, students will have completed course assignments in writing, speaking and evaluation designed to improve skills of critical listening and analysis, public speaking, and writing.  Non-majors will benefit from this intensive speaking preparation as well.  Students will also be exposed to a variety of rhetorical theories as they interact with the text and lecture material. 

A survey course designed to introduce the students to communication theory, models and contexts. The course reviews the historical foundation of the field and then progresses to explanations of contemporary theories.

This course is an introductory and preparatory course in research methods relevant to the field of communication.  By the end of this course, you will have a better understanding of the breadth of the field and you will learn a systematic approach to the study of communication.  In preparation for your research capstone course, you will propose a research project on a topic of interest to you that is relevant to the field of communication.  As a result of this course, you will have a more mature approach to critical thinking, writing, and analysis. 


COM 381 is a required Seminar for Communication majors.  The subject varies depending on the instructor and the semester. In S18 the topic is Feminist Rhetoric.

The senior communication capstone course.

Students will select either an applied or theoretical research approach to analyze a public relations campaign. Applied research gives students the opportunity to create and implement a campaign for a public relations client in a public relations agency environment. Students apply research, strategic planning and problem solving to meet client needs. Students design, execute and evaluate appropriate integrated campaigns for actual clients. Alternately, students may select a completed public relations campaign to research and evaluate using a public relations communication theory. All students will present an analysis of journal or convention paper quality.


The internship is designed to help students make the transition from formal academic study to actual workplace situations.

The stage manager of a live theatre production has a lot of responsibilities.  Through textbook readings and class discussions students will gain an understanding for the tasks involved in running a show.  Students will assist the director in rehearsals, assist the technical director with the coordination of technical elements and their integration into the production, and manage the run of a production on the regular Jewell Theatre season.  Prerequisite: THE 211-216.


Through consultation with the professors and peer mentoring, students will be introduced to techniques used to produce the technical and performance needs of a live theatre performance.  Students also staff the area or operate the control board associated with the registered course during a production on the regular theatre season. Except under rare circumstances, students may sign up for no more than two sections per semester.  Students must complete THE 214-216 before advancing to THE 219: Stage Management.

THE 216 Lighting (1 hr)Hanging and focusing lighting equipment and light board operation for the run of a performance.


Through consultation with the professors and peer mentoring, students will be introduced to techniques used to produce the technical and performance needs of a live theatre performance.  Students also staff the area or operate the control board associated with the registered course during a production on the regular theatre season. Except under rare circumstances, students may sign up for no more than two sections per semester.  Students must complete THE 214-216 before advancing to THE 219: Stage Management.

THE 215 Scenery (1 hr)Constructing or altering scenic elements for a production. May include set running duties backstage during the run of a performance.


Through consultation with the professors and peer mentoring, students will be introduced to techniques used to produce the technical and performance needs of a live theatre performance.  Students also staff the area or operate the control board associated with the registered course during a production on the regular theatre season. Except under rare circumstances, students may sign up for no more than two sections per semester.  Students must complete THE 214-216 before advancing to THE 219: Stage Management.

THE 214 Costuming(1 hr)Constructing, altering or finding clothing and accessories for a production. May include wardrobe duties backstageduring the run of a performance.


Through consultation with the professors and peer mentoring, students will be introduced to techniques used to produce the technical and performance needs of a live theatre performance.  Students also staff the area or operate the control board associated with the registered course during a production on the regular theatre season. Except under rare circumstances, students may sign up for no more than two sections per semester.  Students must complete THE 214-216 before advancing to THE 219: Stage Management.

THE 213 Properties (1 hr)Collecting or creating the stage properties needed in a production. May include prop running duties backstage during the run of a performance.


Through consultation with the professors and peer mentoring, students will be introduced to techniques used to produce the technical and performance needs of a live theatre performance.  Students also staff the area or operate the control board associated with the registered course during a production on the regular theatre season. Except under rare circumstances, students may sign up for no more than two sections per semester.  Students must complete THE 214-216 before advancing to THE 219: Stage Management.

THE 212 Sound (1 hr)Setting and patching sound equipment and operation of the sound system for the run of a performance.  Sometimes also find or create sound cues.


Through consultation with the professors and peer mentoring, students will be introduced to techniques used to produce the technical and performance needs of a live theatre performance.  Students also staff the area or operate the control board associated with the registered course during a production on the regular theatre season. Except under rare circumstances, students may sign up for no more than two sections per semester.  Students must complete THE 214-216 before advancing to THE 219: Stage Management.

THE 211 Audience Management (1 hr)  Duties related to audience relations including publicity and house management responsibilitiesduring therun of a performance.


Our mission is to develop a positive foundation in students by building confidence, self-esteem, and interactive social skills through artistic expression of Ballroom Dance. Our curriculum gives students opportunity to learn the artistic components of ballroom dances of various cultures. In the process, they also learn etiquette, teamwork, and respect for others.

The Theatre Capstone is a project designed to synthesize each theatre student’s undergraduate education in a culminating project in which they have the creative freedom and opportunity to demonstrate disciplinary knowledge to produce a theatrical work as part of the mainstage season.  The capstone project is entirely student-directed and may vary based upon the number of students involved, the disciplinary focus of the students, or the specific skill set of any given undergraduate class.  Each student is expected to have a mastery level of at least two (2) theatrical disciplines, which they contribute to the capstone project.  Likewise, students may participate in or provide as many or as few of the roles needed in order to complete the capstone project.  Disciplinary skills include (but are not limited to): directing, acting, scenic design, costume design, lighting design, properties, playwriting, dramaturgy, make-up/hair, and special effects.

            This project is an independent study experience.  While the Theatre professors have set guidelines and expectations, each student is entirely responsible for fulfilling her/his requirements and expectations, much like the practice of professional theatre.  In this way, this capstone prepares students for the realities of theatre production, education, and presentation.

 


Course Description:

Advanced techniques will be explored in the areas of costuming, lighting, or scenery construction with particular focus on theatre safety and environmental sustainability. Students will build or set up original technical solutions in one of the aforementioned technical areas while gaining skills in writing, speaking, and exhibiting their projects. Prerequisite: THE 105

Course Goals:

Students will gain skills in safe and environmentally sustainable theatre practice while focusing work on assignments designed to challenge their abilities in construction of technical elements.

• Students will study tried and true methods of constructing theatre design elements while being challenged to think of efficiencies and environmentally sustainable practices.

• Students will learn to write technical descriptions of their projects for possibility of conference presentation or publishing.


Through consultation with the professor and peer mentoring, students will be introduced to techniques used to produce the technical needs of a live theatre performance.  Students also staff the area or operate the control board associated with the registered course during a production on the regular theatre season.  Except under rare circumstances, students may sign up for no more than two theatre practicum sections per semester.  Students must complete THE 214-216 before advancing to THE 219: Stage Management course.  Following are the catalog descriptions of the practicum courses: 

THE 211 Audience Management (1 hr)

Working with theatre faculty on tasks related to audience relations; including publicity and house management responsibilities during the run of a performance.

THE 212 Sound (1 hr)

Working with director on generating sound cue list, collecting sounds, and/or editing sound bits.  Students will also set and patch sound equipment and operate the sound board for the run of a performance.  

THE 213 Properties (1 hr)

Working with scenery designer to collect, purchase, or create the stage properties needed in a production. May include prop running duties backstage during the run of a performance.

THE 214 Costuming (1 hr)

Working with guest designer to construct, alter or find clothing and accessories for a production. May include wardrobe duties backstage during the run of a performance.

THE 215 Scenery (1 hr)

Working with scenery designer and technical director to construct or alter scenic elements for a production. May include set running duties backstage during the run of a performance.

THE 216 Lighting (1 hr)

Working with guest designer to hang and focus lighting equipment, write cues, and operate the light board for the run of a performance.


Students will gain skills in the conceptualization and design of technical elements of theatre production in the areas of scenery, props, lighting, sound, costumes, and makeup. Through study of theatrical literature, design theories, and works by historic and current designers, students will learn how to plan, prepare, and execute their own designs resulting in a portfolio of work ready for presentation and exhibition. Students will also learn to write and speak about their designs as they document their process and participate in peer critique.

 


This course introduces students to multicultural perspectives on  American and world theatre.  The focus of the course is on playwrights and plays that offer perspectives into under-represented, marginalized, and minoritized voices and how these identities are represented on the stage.  Specific units will explore the historic and cultural contributions of women playwrights and feminist theatre, African-American/Black and African playwrights, LGBTQ+ identities, Asian performance traditions and Asian-American theatre, and Chican@/ Latin@ performance.  Students will engage in script analysis, dramaturgy, artistic interpretation, and performance projects to investigate how the medium of theatre is inherently a political platform.


This course investigates experimental theatre movements, playwrights and performance artists who use theatre and performance as a medium for social critique. This course involves historical research and performance practice.


The stage manager of a live theatre production has a lot of responsibilities. Through textbook readings and class discussions students will gain an understanding for the tasks involved in running a show. Students will assist the director in rehearsals, assist the technical director with the coordination of technical elements and their integration into the production, and manage the run of a production on the regular Jewell Theatre season. Prerequisite: THE 213-216.