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3-6 Integrated Literacy and Assessment provides intermediate literacy theory to foster language development, create literacy rich environments for upper elementary children using adolescent literature, assess and evaluate literacy learning, and provide differentiation and interventions for diverse learners, including strategies for ELL students in the 3-6 classroom.  Based on the State Standards for College, evidence-based intermediate literacy instruction includes modeled, guided, and direct instruction in the reading workshop; age-appropriate skills and strategies; this course integrates reading/writing, listening/speaking, and viewing/visual representation for the intermediate reader and writer. An eight-week project in which students observe, assess and diagnose literacy acquisition problems and tutor an intermediate grade student is embedded in this course. Program Admission required.


Liberation Theology is a strand of theology that began to take shape in the 1960s under the leadership of Catholic theologians and priests from Central and South America.  Since its inception, it has been adopted, adapted, and developed by a variety of groups from various religious backgrounds across the globe. The purpose of this course is to explore the historical, theological, and practical elements of Liberation Theology.  The course will consist of reading primary and secondary texts by scholars from Latin America, Africa, Asia, and North America.  Along the way, we will consider such things as the historical background of Liberation Theology, the core elements of Liberation Theology, whether or not there is a Liberation Theology or many Liberation Theologies, if Liberation Theology is specific to the Christian tradition, and the relationship between orthodoxy and orthopraxy.  We will also evaluate the critiques that have been levied against Liberation Theology and ask whether or not those critiques are consistent with the intentions of those who practice Liberation Theology.  One of the concluding goals of this course is to develop the capacity to articulate the contours of Liberation Theology to a broad audience and demonstrate how it can be applied in our contemporary context.


The introduces students to, and offers a basis for the critique of, the most common categories by which contemporary religions are compared: history, scripture, rituals, ethics, and political claims. It is a level II CTI course, cross-listed as a 200 level religion course, satisfying aspects of the religion major. This version is created to meet the demands for a Tuesday-Thursday version of the course.

This Moodle houses the ACT-In Major's certification forms.

This site is primarily so you can use turnitin.com to check you papers for plagiarism.

Welcome to the oddly named course, "So you want to be a biologist"! Although the course name is strange, it is an accurate reflection of the foci of the course: 

  1. Helping you discover if Biology is the correct career path for you.
  2. Laying the foundation for you to be a successful biology major at William Jewell College.
Specifically, we will address the questions:
  • What career options are available for someone with a degree in biology?
  • How do I figure out what I want to do with my life? How can I be sure this career is a good fit for me? How do I begin preparing for my chosen career? 
  • What is the best way to study for college-level biology courses? 
  • What skills and information do I need to succeed in science? For example, what needs to be included in a scientific laboratory report? How can I read scientific literature effectively?
  • What is the benefit of doing research as an undergraduate? What research opportunities are available at WJC? What off-campus research opportunities are available? When should I begin doing research?
  • What will my class schedule look like for the next four years? Should I pursue a second major? A minor? What courses do I need to take for my chosen career path?
  • What credentials will I need in order to get accepted to graduate school? Medical school? Professional School?

Cell and molecular biology is the study of the molecular basis of life. It is based on the foundations of four classical disciplines: biochemistry, cell biology, microbiology and genetics. We will combine the principles of these four disciplines to explore the cellular and molecular levels of biological organization. We will investigate the structure and function of archaeal, bacterial, and eukaryotic cells, and the numerous complex events that occur during the life cycle of a cell. The laboratory will provide you with experience using modern molecular biological and cellular techniques to further explore these concepts, and give you the opportunity to design, execute, analyze and present your own questions in cell and molecular biology.


The term “molecular genetics” encompasses the study of how the genome functions on a molecular scale, and describes a group of tools that can be used to answer questions on nearly all biological topics and scales of study. Because the term encompasses such a variety of topics and tools, this course should be useful to all biology, biochemistry, chemistry, or molecular biology students, regardless of the main interest/s of each student. Prerequisite: BIO 234.

After taking this course, you should be able to:

  1. Describe the known types of genes, and identify how each produces one or more phenotype/s.
  2. Describe and use major molecular genetic tools and techniques, e.g. gene discovery, determination of gene function, and genome editing.
  3. Provide examples of how molecular genetic tools or concepts could be used in your planned post-graduate career.
  4. Identify and critically discuss ethical issues surrounding modern genetic and genomic methods and clinical applications.


Human Anatomy is the study of the external and internal structures of the human body as well as the relationships between these structures and how their function is determined by their form. It is anticipated that this course will serve as an introduction to the anatomy of the human body particularly for those entering the biomedical sciences. 

This course is designed for any first-year student interested in pursuing a career as a physician, dentist, optometrist or veterinarian. After exploring the spectrum of medical professions and the characteristics of competitive applicants to medical professional schools, each student will begin writing a personal statement for her/his future application and practice interviewing skills. Additionally, the course exposes students to a variety of current issues in healthcare, including topics related to bioethics and evidence based medicine research. By the end of the course, students will better understand their intended medical profession and how to prepare a compelling application for that program. There are no prerequisites for this course; however, instructor’s consent is required for any non- first year students to register. Fall semester.

This course is designed for any first-year student interested in pursuing a career as a physician, dentist, optometrist or veterinarian. After exploring the spectrum of medical professions and the characteristics of competitive applicants to medical professional schools, each student will begin writing a personal statement for her/his future application and practice interviewing skills. Additionally, the course exposes students to a variety of current issues in healthcare, including topics related to bioethics and evidence based medicine research. By the end of the course, students will better understand their intended medical profession and how to prepare a compelling application for that program. There are no prerequisites for this course; however, instructor’s consent is required for any non- first year students to register. Fall semester.


Human Physiology is the study of the mechanisms by which the human body functions. Students will learn the basic functions of each body system and how the relate to one another to maintain homeostasis. It is anticipated that this course will serve as an introduction to the function of the human body particularly for those entering the biomedical sciences.


Introduction to Human Anatomy for those preparing for careers in the biomedical sciences.

In this course we will be introduced to the amazing world of microorganisms that exist all around and within us, and learn about the different ways that these organisms influence our lives.


This course will examine the importance of public policy advocacy for nonprofit organizations (NPOs) and the impact of nonprofit advocacy on society and social change. LSP 360 K/ POL 217 K places a special emphasis on the evolution of government out of the state of nature through a social contract, the evolution of civil society, American Exceptionalism, the American Creed and modern political parties. It also examines social movements, civil disobedience and the tumultuous 1960s. It will review the policy-making process and NPOs’ role(s) in the process. It will analyze the diverse range of strategies—such as research, building coalitions, convening, civil discourse, grassroots mobilization, lobbying, working with media, and use of social media—that are available to NPOs to carry out their mission and promote their advocacy goals.

The course will culminate in planning, implementing and evaluating a successful advocacy campaign. The course will meet once a week in a small seminar format. Because of the size of the class, students will be expected to not only participate in class discussions but also lead class discussions through the Harkness® Method. Through dialogue and application, students will learn to think critically; identify action issues related to mission; create legislative agendas; form public policy positions; identify stakeholders; and implement advocacy strategies.


This entrepreneurial internship course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to have a practical experience in an entrepreneurial setting.  

Accounting for not-for-profit organizations and state and local governments. Prerequisite: ACC 111 with a grade of C- or better.


Fundamentals of managerial cost accounting including cost/benefit analysis, behavioral considerations, cost-volume-profit analysis, ethics, management control systems, performance measurements, basic costing systems, budgeting, allocation processes, different costs for different purposes and strategic analysis. Prerequisite: ACC 111 with a grade of C- or better. Recommended: ECO 101.


Fundamentals of managerial cost accounting including cost/benefit analysis, behavioral considerations, cost-volume-profit analysis, ethics, management control systems, performance measurements, basic costing systems, budgeting, allocation processes, different costs for different purposes and strategic analysis. Prerequisite: ACC 111 with a grade of C- or better. Recommended: ECO 101.


ACC 311 Intermediate Financial Accounting I (4 cr. hrs.)

Application of accounting theory, standards, principles and procedures for understanding nancial accounting. Study of the objectives of external nancial statements and professional accounting. Particular emphasis on assets, liabilities and corporate capitalization. Prerequisite: ACC 111 with a grade of C- or better.


Organization and implementation of information technology for the collection, organization, and presentation of accounting information with an experiential education and application of systems thinking. 



This course studies the role of the external auditor in the financial markets, the environment in which the auditor operates, planning and audit risk assessment, auditing procedures, audit sampling, and audit reports.

The course goal is to increase awareness and develop an appreciation of the overall audit process and its practice which includes developing an understanding of the components, steps, and outcomes of an audit.  Course includes such concepts as internal controls, audit risk analysis, ethical and professional auditing standards, materiality, substantive testing, the audit plan, fraud risks, etc.

Recommended Prerequisites: ACC 312 (C- or better)

This course provides an introduction to Financial Accounting.  Emphasis is placed on measuring, processing, analyzing, and interpreting elements of the four basic financial statements.

The course goal is to increase awareness of the overall process and objective of financial accounting as well as develop an understanding of the elements required to create financial statements.  Course includes such concepts as the balance sheet (and related components), the income statement (and related components), stockholders' equity, the cash flow statement, and internal controls.

Recommended Prerequisites: CTI 103, CTI 105, CTI 107 or CTI 109. 

Continuation of 311 with study including pensions, leases, accounting changes, deferred taxes, and cash flow. Inclusion of professional projects. Prerequisite: ACC 311 with a grade of C- or better.

The primary objective of this course is to provide the students with comprehensive exposure to the significant topics facing the Sports Business industry.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

 

Through a range of class lectures, class discussions, relevant guest speakers and possibly experiential learning opportunities, students will be exposed to multiple major topics affecting the business side of sport. Students Will:

 

1.   Become familiar with key concepts & terminology that are unique and relevant to the sports business industry.

2.   Understand and demonstrate the importance of management, finance and marketing principles as they pertain to global sports entities.

3.   Gain an appreciation for the unique challenges involved in managing sports business enterprises in rapidly changing environments.


This course is a survey of the major human resource management functions including legal concerns, planning, staffing, training and development, performance management, compensation, health and safety and employee and labor relations. Behavioral research in the area will be examined. Special application exercises or service-learning opportunities are used to enhance skill development. Prerequisites: BUS 202 and sophomore standing

This course is designed to help students appreciate the roles and responsibilities of boards, how nonprofit boards function and what constitutes effective boards and individual board members. It will incorporate exercises on typical governance problems for students to investigate best practices and solutions to those problems.

 

Students will study the history of nonprofit boards and how boards of the future will meet new leadership challenges and demands. They will study the increased scrutiny that nonprofit organizations face regarding accountability and transparency by federal and state regulators and the overall governance structure of nonprofit organizations.


This course offers an introduction to the practices and principles of philanthropy and fundraising in the management of nonprofit organizations. Together we will explore the nature and essential elements of the fundraising process including the sources of philanthropic gifts, causes that receive support, and motivations that influence giving. Time will be devoted to creating a WHY and case statement for a nonprofit and to introducing specific development tools such as the annual development plan, major gifts programs, special events, and grant writing. This course will also investigate and discuss the impact of earned income strategies in a nonprofit context.

An overview of the nonprofit sector and the role mission plays in philanthropy and volunteerism in American Society. Emphasis is placed upon the study of various roles and diversity of fields in the nonprofit sector, including but not limited to religion, arts and culture, education, health, environment, youth and human services. The course will provide an examination of the social history of nonprofit organizations in the United States, to develop an historical perspective and a sense of magnitude, scope, and functions of the nonprofit sector and its relationships with

business and government. Study focuses on ethical, moral, and practical issues in nonprofit leadership, the trust the third sector holds in relationship to other social sectors and the sector’s responsibility to serve the common good.


This course will introduce students to the elements of volunteer management and engage them in a variety of community service opportunities, including interviews and projects. Course objectives include:

  • Examine the foundations, motivations and challenges of developing a successful volunteer program.
  • Study the key components of a successful volunteer program, recruitment strategies and learn how to retain good volunteers.
  • Focus on the role, value and dynamics of volunteerism in fulfilling the missions of nonprofits.
  • Be introduced to risk management factors that need to be considered in volunteer management, including effective staff and volunteer screening.

This course will examine the importance of public policy advocacy for nonprofit organizations (NPOs) and the impact of nonprofit advocacy on society and social change. LSP 360/POL 217 K places a special emphasis on the evolution of government out of the state of nature through a social contract, the evolution of civil society, American Exceptionalism and the American Creed. It also examines social movements, civil disobedience and the tumultuous 1960s. It will review the policy-making process and NPOs’ role(s) in the process. It will analyze the diverse range of strategies—such as research, building coalitions, convening, civil discourse, grassroots mobilization, lobbying, working with media, and use of social media—that are available to NPOs to carry out their mission and promote their advocacy goals.

                                                                  

The course will culminate in a discussion of and project on organizational capacity building to plan, implement, and evaluate a successful advocacy campaign. The course will meet once a week in a small seminar format. Because of the size of the class, students will be expected to not only participate in class discussions but also lead class discussions through the Harkness® Method. Through dialogue and application, students will learn to think critically; identify action issues related to mission; create legislative agendas; form public policy positions; identify stakeholders; and implement advocacy strategies.


Strategic planning is defined as a disciplined effort to produce fundamental decisions and actions that shape what an organization is, what it does, and why it does it (Bryson, 2004). The external environments or organizations are becoming more complex and increasingly uncertain as a result of various political, social, economic and technological changes. These dynamic environments compel public, private and third sector managers to identify priorities, focus scarce resources on those priorities, craft effective strategies and implement them successfully to ensure survival in the long term. Strategic management provides managers with a future perspective, an external focus, a fundamental problem-solving orientation and a set of practical tools.

 

The intent of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the approaches and methods used in strategic decision making and of the effective leadership of boards, staff, volunteers and clients in the process. It will acquaint students with the theoretical underpinnings of strategic planning and help them master some strategic planning techniques such as environmental scanning, stakeholder analysis, strategic issue identification and strategy formulation by providing an opportunity to create a strategic plan for a nonprofit agency. The course will also review the various facilitation styles used in organizations.


This course is designed to help students appreciate the roles and responsibilities of boards, how nonprofit boards function and what constitutes effective boards and individual board members. It will incorporate exercises on typical governance problems for students to investigate best practices and solutions to those problems.

Students will study the history of nonprofit boards and how boards of the future will meet new leadership challenges and demands. They will study the increased scrutiny that nonprofit organizations face regarding accountability and transparency by federal and state regulators and the overall governance structure of nonprofit organizations.


A variety of strategies and resources will be examined about helping people who experience heightened suffering, oppression and poverty. Special attention will be given to various perspectives about service through the study of nonprofit organizations, volunteerism and individual service models. Students’ individual strengths will be assessed for the purposes of applying them toward interventions. Each student is required to complete 30 hours of community service during the semester. This course may be taken as LSP 201 or SVL 201 to meet the requirements of the Nonprofit Leadership major or of the William Jewell College Nonprofit Leadership Certificate Program. Prerequisite: LSP 101 or SVL 101 or permission of the instructor. Cross-listed as SVL 201.


This portfolio will be used to document activity for the William Jewell College Nonprofit Leadership Certificate. 

This portfolio will be used to document activity for the William Jewell College Nonprofit Leadership Certificate. 

Nonprofit Leadership Preferred Internship Program including:

1. Overview of process
2. Important internship placement resources
3. Internship paperwork that is used for course credit requirements
4. Current internship opportunities
5. Contact Information

Building on the course material in CHE 121, the student will learn about and apply fundamental chemical concepts that will lay the groundwork for future study in the fields of chemistry, biochemistry, and related fields.

Biochemistry Laboratory (CHE 450L) will introduce students to laboratory techniques commonly employed in Biochemistry, with an emphasis on protein purification and characterization.

The purpose of the laboratory portion of this course is to provide you, the student, with the opportunity to "do" chemistry.  The experiments are designed to provide an active learning environment.  The laboratory experiences will reinforce your understanding of the scientific method and various chemical phenomena.  The experiments have been selected to enhance the CHE 122 classroom discussion and provide answers to many of the questions posed in lecture course.  Students will work in groups to gather data, design experiments, and evaluate information.


The purpose of General Chemistry I Laboratory (CHE 121L) is to introduce students to basic techniques of laboratory experiments while also applying the concepts learned from the concurrent lecture.  Topics covered include the basics of laboratory measurement and quantifying and characterizing chemical substances.  The course will be taught through a “guided-inquiry” approach, meaning that each concept is introduced in the form of an investigative question which must be answered through experimentation.

A general chemistry course is designed to introduce you to a variety of elementary scientific and chemical topics. However, we cover a limited number of topics, so that the course is not merely a “survey” of those areas. Instead, each topic is covered in enough depth so that you learn many problem-solving skills that are relevant to that topic. The assumption is that the student in CHE 121 will be continuing with additional coursework in chemistry.

This course will be useful to all physical and biological science majors, to persons interested in the health sciences, to civil and pre-engineering students, and to others who want to begin to get a solid introduction to chemistry. Since chemistry is considered to be the “central science” and because of the increasing inter-relatedness of different scientific disciplines, the study of chemistry is important to anyone who wants to be considered scientifically literate.

Physical Chemistry Laboratory is designed to expose students to common laboratory techniques employed in Physical Chemistry and to bring home real-world observations and applications of concepts learned in the concurrent lecture course.  Students will gain competency in the production, recording, and reporting of laboratory data.

Physical Chemistry, an upper-level course for Chemistry and Biochemistry majors, revisits topics from General Chemistry with mathematical rigor and deeper insight. The course seeks to answer four central questions key in the study of Chemistry:  (1) How do we describe matter? (2) How do we study and characterize matter? (3) What is the direction of chemical change? (4) How fast does chemical change occur?  Each question is answered respectively from the perspective of Physical Chemistry by (1) Quantum Mechanics, (2) Spectroscopy, (3) Thermochemistry & Equilibrium, and (4) Kinetics. An emphasis will be made in relating these topics to applications in understanding chemical and biological systems.

Building on the course material in CHE 121, the student will learn about and apply fundamental chemical concepts that will lay the groundwork for future study in the fields of chemistry, bio-chemistry, and related fields.

            Objectives:

1.  Learn problem-solving techniques.

2.  Learn about fundamental concepts including:

a.     Gas laws

b.     Reaction kinetics

c.     Acid-base chemistry

d.     Thermochemistry

e.     Spectroscopy (interaction between light    and matter)

f.      Molecular structure (VSPER, hybridization)

g.     Chemical equilibrium

h.     Reduction-oxidation chemistry (including electrochemistry and oxidation states)

3.     Explore other chemical phenomena including biochemical processes of photo-synthesis and fermentation


The purpose of the laboratory portion of this course is to provide you, the student, with the opportunity to "do" chemistry.  The experiments are designed to provide an active learning environment.  The laboratory experiences will reinforce your understanding of the scientific method and various chemical phenomena.  The experiments have been selected to enhance the classroom discussion and provide answers to many of the questions posed in lecture course.  Students will work in pairs or groups to gather data, design experiments, and evaluate information.

As a course with a focus on obtaining and using chemical information this course will involve a discussion of ethical issues pertaining to obtaining, creating, and disseminating chemical information. An overview of parameters involved in ethical decision-making will be introduced, with presentations of case studies. Students will be introduced to the use of chemical literature and techniques of technical writing. The course is designed to expose students to the various resources used by chemists to research a chemical topic. During the first part of the semester, students will learn about techniques for searching for chemical information and about available resources for accessing chemical information. A field trip to Linda Hall Library will expose students to this premiere science and technology library in Kansas City. The course culminates in a final oral research report presented in a technical report format about a chemical compound family. As a rule, one-hour lecture periods are scheduled; however, the field trip to Linda Hall Library will require a two to three-hour session.


The studies begun in CHE 301 continue in this course. Typical

topics explored include the synthesis and reactions of aromatic compounds, alcohols, ethers, carbonyl compounds, and amines. An emphasis is placed on the functional groups involved in the chemistry of biological molecules.

Biochemistry is the study of the chemistry of life.  Thus, this course explores the molecular interactions of biomolecules.  With this focus, it will incorporate concepts from organic and inorganic chemistry, genetics, microbiology, cell biology and molecular biology.  The student will be required to build on concepts he/she has learned in previous biology and chemistry courses to successfully complete this course.  With this in mind, the outcomes of this course will be: 

  1. to understand the relationship between structure and function of biomolecules
  2. to understand the inter-relationship of biochemical reactions
  3. to incorporate these concepts into a well-rounded understanding of the activity of organelles and cells
  4. to gain skills in reading and understanding primary literature discussing biomolecules
  5. to gain more knowledge of the following chemical concepts:        a.  chemical kinetics, especially in relationship to enzyme                   kinetics
        b.  thermochemistry

        c.  oxidation-reduction chemistry



This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of learning processes and to increase classroom-learning effectiveness. Students will learn about various techniques in reading, test taking, time managing, note taking and studying. The students will be using their best techniques in current courses. Elective credit only.

Taken from Jewell's 2018-19 Course Catalog, pg. 122.

Judaism, Christianity and Islam (JCI) is a mid-level religion course in the religion major and also counts as a Level II CTI course in the core curriculum entitled, "The Responsible Self." To those ends the course is designed to fulfill the objectives of both the religion major and the Level II CTI "Sacred and Secular" objectives [link to objectives of both]. JCI offers students an introductory comparison of the three monotheistic religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The three are compared in reference to the following five criteria: historical origins, scripture, worship, ethics and political presence.

This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of learning processes and to increase classroom-learning effectiveness. Students will learn about various techniques in reading, test taking, time managing, note taking and studying. The students will be using their best techniques in current courses. Elective credit only.

As taken from William Jewell's Course Catalog.

This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of learning processes and to increase classroom-learning effectiveness. Students will learn about various techniques in reading, test taking, time managing, note taking and studying. The students will be using their best techniques in current courses. Elective credit only.

Jewell's Course Catalog, pg. 122
This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of learning processes and to increase classroom-learning effectiveness. Students will learn about various techniques in reading, test taking, time managing, note taking and studying. The students will be using their best techniques in current courses. Elective credit only.

Jewell's Course Catalog, pg. 122

A Moodle for the 2018 Jewell Faculty Workshop, "Critical Thinking In Our Time & At Jewell"

Welcome to the 2017 Faculty Workshop Moodle site.  You will find the agenda, our reading materials, and supplementary materials here.

This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of learning processes and to increase classroom-learning effectiveness. Students will learn about various techniques in reading, test taking, time managing, note taking and studying. The students will be using their best techniques in current courses.

Elective credit only.

This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of learning processes and to increase classroom-learning effectiveness. Students will learn about various techniques in reading, test taking, time managing, note taking and studying. The students will be using their best techniques in current courses.

Elective credit only.

This course introduces students to research methods applicable to an academic career at William Jewell and responsible participation in the wider scholarly community. An understanding of how information is organized and efficiently located will be gained through the application of information-seeking practices. Students will critically analyze the credibility of a variety of information resources and gain skills to independently identify and select appropriate scholarly resources. Citation styles, ethical use of information and plagiarism will also be addressed. 1 hour Elective credit only.

Welcome to COM 110! Whether you have decided to major or minor in the study of Communication, Public Relations, or Digital Media Communication, or if this class just looked like an interesting elective, I’m glad you are here to learn more about the study of communication. In this class you will gain a basic understanding of communication theory and terminology, and learn to apply it in a number of communication contexts. In particular, you will learn how the meaning of communication messages changes based on the ideological, cultural, and contextual assumptions and implications that all participants bring to the message.


Course Description

A study of speech communication theory and practice. The practice and presentation of various forms of speech communication activities.

Course Objectives

The Communication Learning Outcome being assessed for this course is: Our students will prepare, organize and deliver well-written, verbal and non-verbal messages crafted for a particular audience and context.

This will guide the work students do in class as they prepare speeches for several types public speaking settings: Introductions, Informative Speaking, Persuasive Speaking, and Special Occasion Speaking.


The senior communication capstone course.

Integrated Communication occurs where the traditional boundaries between internal communication, publicity, advertising, public relations and marketing merge in concept and practice. Students will focus on coordinating an organization's entire communication strategy to convey a consistent message to target audiences.

This course is a course in advanced public speaking.  By the end of the semester, students will have completed course assignments in writing, speaking and evaluation designed to improve skills of critical listening and analysis, public speaking, and writing.  Non-majors will benefit from this intensive speaking preparation as well.  Students will also be exposed to a variety of rhetorical theories as they interact with the text and lecture material. 

A survey course designed to introduce the students to communication theory, models and contexts. The course reviews the historical foundation of the field and then progresses to explanations of contemporary theories.

This course is an introductory and preparatory course in research methods relevant to the field of communication.  By the end of this course, you will have a better understanding of the breadth of the field and you will learn a systematic approach to the study of communication.  In preparation for your research capstone course, you will propose a research project on a topic of interest to you that is relevant to the field of communication.  As a result of this course, you will have a more mature approach to critical thinking, writing, and analysis. 


COM 381 is a required Seminar for Communication majors.  The subject varies depending on the instructor and the semester. In S18 the topic is Feminist Rhetoric.

The senior communication capstone course.

Students will select either an applied or theoretical research approach to analyze a public relations campaign. Applied research gives students the opportunity to create and implement a campaign for a public relations client in a public relations agency environment. Students apply research, strategic planning and problem solving to meet client needs. Students design, execute and evaluate appropriate integrated campaigns for actual clients. Alternately, students may select a completed public relations campaign to research and evaluate using a public relations communication theory. All students will present an analysis of journal or convention paper quality.


The internship is designed to help students make the transition from formal academic study to actual workplace situations.

Our mission is to develop a positive foundation in students by building confidence, self-esteem, and interactive social skills through artistic expression of Ballroom Dance. Our curriculum gives students opportunity to learn the artistic components of ballroom dances of various cultures. In the process, they also learn etiquette, teamwork, and respect for others.

The Theatre Capstone is a project designed to synthesize each theatre student’s undergraduate education in a culminating project in which they have the creative freedom and opportunity to demonstrate disciplinary knowledge to produce a theatrical work as part of the mainstage season.  The capstone project is entirely student-directed and may vary based upon the number of students involved, the disciplinary focus of the students, or the specific skill set of any given undergraduate class.  Each student is expected to have a mastery level of at least two (2) theatrical disciplines, which they contribute to the capstone project.  Likewise, students may participate in or provide as many or as few of the roles needed in order to complete the capstone project.  Disciplinary skills include (but are not limited to): directing, acting, scenic design, costume design, lighting design, properties, playwriting, dramaturgy, make-up/hair, and special effects.

            This project is an independent study experience.  While the Theatre professors have set guidelines and expectations, each student is entirely responsible for fulfilling her/his requirements and expectations, much like the practice of professional theatre.  In this way, this capstone prepares students for the realities of theatre production, education, and presentation.

 


Course Description:

Advanced techniques will be explored in the areas of costuming, lighting, or scenery construction with particular focus on theatre safety and environmental sustainability. Students will build or set up original technical solutions in one of the aforementioned technical areas while gaining skills in writing, speaking, and exhibiting their projects. Prerequisite: THE 105

Course Goals:

Students will gain skills in safe and environmentally sustainable theatre practice while focusing work on assignments designed to challenge their abilities in construction of technical elements.

• Students will study tried and true methods of constructing theatre design elements while being challenged to think of efficiencies and environmentally sustainable practices.

• Students will learn to write technical descriptions of their projects for possibility of conference presentation or publishing.


Through consultation with the professor and peer mentoring, students will be introduced to techniques used to produce the technical needs of a live theatre performance.  Students also staff the area or operate the control board associated with the registered course during a production on the regular theatre season.  Except under rare circumstances, students may sign up for no more than two stagecraft sections per semester.  Students must complete THE 214-216 before advancing to THE 310: Stage Management course.  Following are the catalog descriptions of the practicum courses:

 

THE 211 Audience Management (1 hr)

Duties related to audience relations including publicity and house management responsibilities during the run of a performance.

THE 212 Sound (1 hr)

Setting and patching sound equipment and operation of the sound system for the run of a performance.  Sometimes also find or create sound cues.

THE 213 Properties (1 hr)

Collecting or creating the stage properties needed in a production. May include prop running duties backstage during the run of a performance.

THE 214 Costuming (1 hr)

Constructing, altering or finding clothing and accessories for a production. May include wardrobe duties backstage during the run of a performance.

THE 215 Scenery (1 hr)

Constructing or altering scenic elements for a production. May include set running duties backstage during the run of a performance.

THE 216 Lighting (1 hr)

Hanging and focusing lighting equipment and light board operation for the run of a performance.

THE 217 Dramaturgy (1 hr)

Providing the creative team, cast and audience with relevant historical and literary contextual information appropriate for the production.

THE 218 Acting (1 hr)

Developing the skills necessary for performing as an actor including character research, movement and vocal training, self-evaluation and reflection. 


Students will gain skills in the conceptualization and design of technical elements of theatre production in the areas of scenery, props, lighting, sound, costumes, and makeup. Through study of theatrical literature, design theories, and works by historic and current designers, students will learn how to plan, prepare, and execute their own designs resulting in a portfolio of work ready for presentation and exhibition. Students will also learn to write and speak about their designs as they document their process and participate in peer critique.

 


This course introduces students to multicultural perspectives on  American and world theatre.  The focus of the course is on playwrights and plays that offer perspectives into under-represented, marginalized, and minoritized voices and how these identities are represented on the stage.  Specific units will explore the historic and cultural contributions of women playwrights and feminist theatre, African-American/Black and African playwrights, LGBTQ+ identities, Asian performance traditions and Asian-American theatre, and Chican@/ Latin@ performance.  Students will engage in script analysis, dramaturgy, artistic interpretation, and performance projects to investigate how the medium of theatre is inherently a political platform.


This course investigates experimental theatre movements, playwrights and performance artists who use theatre and performance as a medium for social critique. This course involves historical research and performance practice.


The stage manager of a live theatre production has a lot of responsibilities. Through textbook readings and class discussions students will gain an understanding for the tasks involved in running a show. Students will assist the director in rehearsals, assist the technical director with the coordination of technical elements and their integration into the production, and manage the run of a production on the regular Jewell Theatre season. Prerequisite: THE 213-216.

THE 314- Students will research and create lighting and sound plots, edit and mix sound elements, select color and pattern media and figure cue sheets. Students will also gain experience hanging and focusing stage lighting fixtures. They will create a portfolio of design work that will be used at the portfolio review at the final exam period. Taking THE 210 in advance of this course is helpful but not required. Those students who are not certified on tools and equipment used for assignments in the class will gain those skills in class.

Through consultation with the professor and peer mentoring, students will be introduced to techniques used to produce the technical needs of a live theatre performance. Students also staff the area or operate the control board associated with the registered course during a production on the regular theatre season. Except under rare circumstances, students may sign up for no more than two stagecraft sections per semester. Students must complete all six tasks before advancing to THE 310: Stage Management course.

This site is set up for sharing information about Jewell Theatre Company productions.

Designed to guide students into an understanding of small group communication processes and theories so they can function effectively in small groups. The students will be able to put theory into practice during their small group interaction throughout the semester. Discussion, small group activities, and projects allow students to monitor individual growth as group members and potential leaders.

This course explores the uses and capabilities of the most widely used web page editing software. Using Adobe Dreamweaver and other software, students will apply design principles, layout techniques and typography to create visually compelling and complex web pages and web sites.

DMC 260 Digital Painting & Illustration

This course explores the expressive and creative functionality of Adobe Photoshop, Corel Painter Pro and their mobile versions used on iPads. Drawing basics using the many artistic painting and illustrating tools within the software will be explored. Image creation and manipulation via layer management & adjustment, color methods, effects and other techniques will complete your well-rounded understanding of digital painting & illustrating. This course will use Photoshop and Wacom graphic tablets as well as stylus pens with an iPad (if student owns iPad & pen- optional). 

Prerequisite: 

  • Basic familiarity with Adobe Photoshop is expected 
    • Dabble now at one of the PLC Mac rooms
  • DMC 125 2D Design is helpful

Textbook:

NOTES

*Why a separate graphics tablet and not just a pen for your iPad? Not everyone will have an iPad. If you have an iPad, you can draw/paint with different compatible pens (which cost extra). However, the iPad is not multi-pressure sensitive, nor is the Apple pencil. The Wacom Intuos tablet is multi-pressure sensitive and so is the pen. This allows for realistic painting and painterly feel when drawing or using a multitude of simulated surfaces and artist tools. The Apple Pencil will work with all iPad software. Other Apple iPad compatible pens may not work with all iPad apps (read the fine print before buying). If you have the Apple Pencil it will mimic sensitivity and pressure. For this class, consistency is key, therefore, we all need to use a Wacom tablet.

**Mobile apps are much lighter versions of Adobe computer software. Mobil apps will give you the mobility and freedom to create anywhere. However, tools are limited and spread across several mobile apps. Still, it’s a great way to work, draw, sketch and create THEN open in the more robust Adobe computer software for professional editing, designing, drawing, painting, illustrating, etc! 



This course explores the elements and principles of two-dimensional art and design, with a focus on their use in digital art forms and environments. Color theory, compositional strategies and using Adobe Creative Suite to output graphics will be addressed. Creating effective visual hierarchy will also be practiced.

DMC 225 TYPOGRAPHY

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

This course studies the letterform as an essential element within the field of graphicand web design. This course will explore letterforms as communication, composition and expression. Areas explored include letterform anatomy, systems of measurement, types of letterforms (fonts) and how to use type effectively in design.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: DMC LEARNING OUTCOMES 

Our students will•demonstrate an understanding of foundational principles of design, including color theory; typography; layout strategies and composition as they relate to digital media.competently use a variety of software applications for digital print media.utilize various applications in coding, animation, audio and video to develop and manage industry standard content in web environments.critically evaluate visual and written communication by identifying their theoretical, aesthetic, historical and ethical assumptions and implications. 


CTI 150 or Identity and Society is an introductory course in how to interact with others through the creation and perception of personal identities. Students will reflect on how they enact their own ideological, cultural, and contextual assumptions regarding their relational perceptions of self and others, while learning how to engage in constructive, authentic communication.


This is a Moodle for the Faculty working in the Core Curriculum.  You can find materials for assessment, workshops, and teaching.

This is the Moodle site to support the faculty team developing CTI 150, "Identity & Society."

Site to continue discussion of SS assessment

This course will explore what structural attributes are needed to make a community strong and sustainable. We will survey some influential social justice philosophies while asking if it is possible to plan for the equitable, sustainable well-being of the members of an urban community. How can these philosophies be practically applied in actual communities in a way that protects individual happiness, community values and environmental capital? We will examine real-world proposals for community planning that attempt to answer questions such as: How are the values of that community translated into a healthy development plan for that community? What factors must be considered in designing the infrastructure that underlies healthy neighborhoods and communities within the urban context?  The Kansas City metropolitan area will serve as our case study.

Course Objectives:

1. Explore influential social justice philosophies and ethical decision-making that have contributed to community design and urban develop justice. 

2. Explore the factors that comprise sustainable planning for a region or community.  

3. Explore how the well being of a community is influenced by values, planning and development. 

4. Application of the exploration in a-c by proposing practical implementation of a community-based practice or policy that addresses a community need that is linked to sustainable urban development policy


An introductory course in how to interact with others through the creation and perception of personal identities. Students will reflect on how they enact their own ideological, cultural and contextual assumptions regarding their relational perceptions of self and others, while learning how to engage in constructive, authentic communication.

As taken from the WJC Course Catalog.

CTI 150 or Identity and Society is an introductory course in how to interact with others through the creation and perception of personal identities. Students will reflect on how they enact their own ideological, cultural, and contextual assumptions regarding their relational perceptions of self and others, while learning how to engage in constructive, authentic communication.


Judaism, Christianity and Islam (JCI) is a mid-level religion course in the religion major and also counts as a Level II CTI course in the core curriculum entitled, "The Responsible Self." To those ends the course is designed to fulfill the objectives of both the religion major and the Level II CTI "Sacred and Secular" objectives [link to objectives of both]. JCI offers students an introductory comparison of the three monotheistic religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The three are compared in reference to the following five criteria: historical origins, scripture, worship, ethics and political presence.

CTI 150 or Identity and Society is an introductory course in how to interact with others through the creation and perception of personal identities. Students will reflect on how they enact their own ideological, cultural, and contextual assumptions regarding their relational perceptions of self and others, while learning how to engage in constructive, authentic communication.


CTI 150 or Identity and Society is an introductory course in how to interact with others through the creation and perception of personal identities. Students will reflect on how they enact their own ideological, cultural, and contextual assumptions regarding their relational perceptions of self and others, while learning how to engage in constructive, authentic communication.